History of Colon Cancer

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I do not remember the specifics around when my nana passed away, but I always knew it was the liver cancer that did it. I was in grade 5, and my nana was like my second mom. I was devastated when she passed, and to this day the thought of it still brings tears to my eyes.

Three days before my colonoscopy, I asked my mom to provide me with more details around how the cancer killed her. She let me know that nana let her colon get so bad (and hid it from her family), that by the end she was sitting on towels at home due to the amount of blood coming out of her bottom. Those signs were clear indicators that things were really bad, so no one was surprised with her diagnosis that it had spread to her liver. She passed away close to 6 months later.

After her diagnosis, approximately two years later my grandfather (still on my mom’s side), was also diagnosed with colon cancer. He was lucky to have caught it much sooner and his had not spread. He was a cancer survivor. I remember knowing as a young kid that grandpa had a “poo bag”, properly known as a colostomy bag. We went out for lunch one time, and half way through he said he had to leave. In the car on the drive home I realized that his bag had popped open and leaked on his sweater. That memory always stuck with me, and I knew I never wanted a “poo bag”.

Around the age of 17 I began to noticed little traces of blood myself. Since i now knew from my family history that this was the biggest sign of colon cancer, I pushed my doctor to allow me to receive a colonoscopy. It is not common at that age to have that procedure, but I am thankful I did. They discovered I had a fissure, and let me know throughout the years it will be common to see a little bit of ribboning. As the years passed I slowly began to notice it more. Being a paranoid person I would google images of bowel moments from colon cancer patients (FYI, it is disgusting so only do this if you really need to lol). Those images looked nothing like mine, so I brushed it off.

I should also note I had a horrible experience during my first colonoscopy. I was so hungry the night before during my prep I was nauseous. The day of the procedure I had a major anxiety attack on the operating table due to my fear of needles. It was bad, I truthfully I was never looking forward to ever having to do it again. This also clearly played a part as to why I didn’t repush another colonoscopy when my gut was telling me too.

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The Face

Describing a facial expression is proving to be harder than I originally thought. April 8th, 2014 was what I call “The Day of the Doctors”. First appointment of the day was with my family doctor. I have been going to him since I was in diapers and my parents as well as sister all see him. He knows my medical history as well as my family’s history inside and out. He walked in the room, sat down and said “What is going on with you?”, as he opened up my file and gave me what I call “the face”. He flipped through all of my past papers as he described to me his confusion when he first received my CT results. That was the first real moment I could feel the shift in my life. These “shadows” or what he was now referring to as “liver lesions”, were more serious than I made myself shrug off over the weekend. I kept asking him what he thought they were, and what the worst case scenario would be. He refused to give me anything to work off of, explaining my surgeon will have a better idea.

Second visit was to a blood clinic. Although my family doctor was sure that my surgeon would request a blood test, he ordered me one anyways just in case. I had time between the two appointments so I thought what the heck.

Meeting with the general surgeon was a little daunting. I was going with the thought that he would be speaking to us (I forgot to mention my mother decided to take the afternoon off to come to this appointment.) about getting me a liver biopsy. We are called in, sit down, and he asks, “What are you here for?”. Um, shouldn’t you know already? I pipe up and say I had a CT of my abdominal area and he has the results. He looks down at them, and then gives me “the face”.

After explaining that if they are hemangiomas he will not be able to biopsy them, he begins to explain the next steps. “Liver cancer is rarely primary, so if this is cancer it must have come from somewhere else. We need to rule out all other areas it could be before I will be able to biopsy. Therefore, you will have a mammogram, colonoscopy, chest CT and MRI in order to make sure. Oh, and you need a different type of blood test. There is a clinic down the hall.”

After yet another drawing of my blood, the doctor’s admin books my first exam. Colonoscopy. I need a work up by my family doctor before my Monday procedure, so back to the office I went.

It is now closer to 5pm and I find myself back in the same chair I was in this morning. My doctor sounds shocked that he is sending me for a colonoscopy, since I had one when I was 17 and all they found was a fissure (tear or split in the lining of the anus). He then reassured me that this surgeon was an amazing doctor and he knows what he is doing. He let me know as well that my first blood results should be back on Friday, so he would call me then.

I explained later that evening to my mother and a friend about “the face”. They both thought I was crazy, but they didn’t see the eyes. It is like they all knew I had a death sentence, but no one was allowed to say it until they had proof. Well, even without words, I could feel it in their eyes.